Mormon News Report: 13 April 2017

Mormon News Report: 13 April 2017


The First Presidency released their 2017 Easter message, which was signed by all 3 members. You can find it at LDS.org
Fear not, Idahoans. Moroni has returned. “The temple, closed since March 2015, will open to the public Saturday, April 22, through Saturday, May 20, except Sundays. It will be rededicated on Sunday, June 4, 2017, in three sessions.”
“It’s not unheard of for larger religious institutions — such as Brigham Young University, which is owned and operated by the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — to have their own police forces. Some evangelical Christian colleges such as Baylor University, a Baptist school, also have their own law enforcement officers.”
 
From the Mormons Behaving Badly files: “Fourth District Judge Thomas Low took long pauses and became choked up as he announced his decision to order a prison term for Keith Robert Vallejo, whom a jury convicted of 10 counts of second-degree felony forcible sexual abuse and one count of object rape, a first-degree felony. Two women testified at the trial that he had inappropriately touched them during separate stays at his Provo home in 2013 and 2014. “The court has no doubt that Mr. Vallejo is an extraordinary, good man. But great men,” the judge said Wednesday before taking a long pause, “sometimes do bad things.” And as he handed down sentences of one-to-15 years in prison for the second-degree felonies and a five-years-to-life term for the object rape, Low again took a pause to compose himself before ordering the terms to run concurrent to one another.”
“What all this leads to is I’ve finally made my peace with LDS architecture. The designs are not only practical but they send a message. And the message is this: “We are durable, stable, sturdy and firm as the mountains around us. But while we may have flowered in the desert, our roots run to New England where picturesque steeples set the tone for faith in America.”” I loved going to the old Rexburg Tabernacle when I was going to school there, and I really love the 1950-1960 Mormon buildings in the Detroit area – they seemed to have a uniqueness that you don’t see in other Mormon buildings. I guess there’s a familiarity to Mormon buildings now, which is nice (and, more importantly, cheap), but…give me those old creaky drafty buildings.
For those of you on the academic side, the University of Virginia is looking for a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer in Mormon Studies for the 2017-2018 academic year. “Duties include, but are not limited to, teaching two courses per semester. Applicants should evidence experience in and commitment to undergraduate and graduate teaching in a liberal arts framework, and be prepared to participate in both a large team-taught introductory-level class and smaller upper-level courses. Specifically, the Fellow will teach three seminars in his or her discipline and on topics of his or her choice. In addition, the Fellow will team-teach, with the Richard Lyman Bushman Professor of Mormon Studies, an introductory survey on Mormonism in relation to American culture.”
Don’t let the headline (or the following snipit) scare you off – this is actually a great profile piece on Williams, and his road to BYU and beyond. “Williams chose the school even though he isn’t Mormon. He signed its “Honor Code” and became part of its miniscule black population. He endured the endless double takes—classmates making eye contact, looking away, then slowly turning back to hold a stare for one…two…three seconds. He was once suspended for—gasp!—underage drinking, and he was once exiled for a full season for—the horror!—having sex.”
“The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Highlands, Harare, has been hauled before the Harare Civil Court by a Bulawayo woman for allegedly failing to pay a balance of $32 000 as compensation for her son’s death. The matter was brought before Harare Civil Court magistrate Mr Brighton Pabwe, but was deferred to May 3. It is alleged that on November 20, 2015, Winnie Mpofu and the church, represented by Shawn Boshoff as legal counsel, entered into an agreement in which the church undertook to pay the sum of $50 000 as compensation for the death of her son. The court heard that earlier that year on May 22, Elder Brandon Cornelius, who is a church member, accidentally struck Daniel Mabhena while driving. Mpofu told the court that the church contacted the family representatives and offered to support and provide any assistance needed by the family in a show of good faith. As a result, the court heard, the parties entered into an agreement to put in writing details pertaining to the settlement of all disputes. According to the agreement, disputes referred to “all past, present and future known and unknown disputes, including all claims, liabilities, damages, injuries, suits and proceeding arising out of the accident”. In terms of Clause 2.2.1 of the agreement, the full amount of the payment should have been paid by February 15 last year. Mpofu further told the court that the church had so far paid the sum of $18 000, leaving an outstanding balance of $32 000, which is now long overdue. She further alleged that despite a series of demands she made, the church neglected to pay.


“But as a child, looking through the pages of the children’s Book of Mormon, I became distracted—it has so many drawings of boys and men. I liked the men who were painted in bright red outfits, but I struggled to find images of women. From memory, I saw three: One of Sariah, being doubtful and looking forlorn. Another of the Lamanite girls screaming as the priests of King Noah took them. And lastly, Abish. She was dressed in dank, dark colours, looking every whit a slave. None of the women looked happy.”
“And so Splitting the Sky, a YouTube series made by, for, and about Mormon women, was born. We’ve worked for the last three years developing the idea, honing our film skills (although we regrettably still lack real sound expertise), and interviewing women. The real goal of the project is to honor and strengthen the 30 women that we’ve interviewed, but we’ve decided that if we can create a space where viewers feel honored and strengthened—and maybe expanded a bit too—that would be a pretty good bonus.”
Apr 12, 1802
Parley Parker Pratt was born in Burlington, Ostego County, New York, on 12 April 1802, the middle son of five born to Jared and Charity Pratt. At a young age he was required to work to help sustain the family, which limited his formal education. His mother taught him to read the Bible at home, where, he claimed, Christian virtues were taught by example. He became a voracious reader. When he was sixteen and boarding with his father’s sister, he had his last opportunity for formal schooling. [Source: Utah History Encyclopedia: Parley P. Pratt, http://www.uen.org/utah_history_encyclopedia/]