Mormon News Report: 14 April 2017

Mormon News Report: 14 April 2017


“Sister Bingham said, “While our beliefs and convictions may vary, we are united with other faiths in our commitment to a higher cause that transcends our personal interests and motivates us to give of our substance, our time, and our energies on behalf of our fellow men and women.”” A full video of President Bingham’s remarks is at Mormon Newsroom
“She noted that interfaith efforts stretch beyond financial support to enlisting critical “human resources — those remarkable individuals within our organizations whose compassion, skill and devotion combine to reach others on a deeply personal level.” With that in mind, LDS Charities has long joined hands with other religions to help alleviate human suffering. Bingham specifically pointed out for praise the Islamic Relief organization’s “Day of Dignity” program aiding the homeless, and the Episcopal Migration Ministries’ emphasis on helping immigrants find employment.”
““Our role in this effort is critical,” said Sister Bingham. “We need to build bridges among faith-based organizations, understand each other’s work and cooperate more. We need to organize the time, talents and resources of faithful people who desire to help. We are united in a common commitment to care for those in need. While individually we can do great good, collectively we can accomplish so much more.””
“[Journalist] Megan McArdle looks eagerly for the answers, and in each area she examines, she continues to find return to a feature that you may already expect: Mormonism.”
“Hours before they were due before a federal judge to face a potential contempt of court citation, Paragon Contractors and Brian Jessop settled a dispute with the U.S. Department of Labor over fines levied against it. Filings in U.S. District Court stated the company agreed to pay $200,000 over the next year.”
Pardon the homer angle on this one. I have never heard of Wally Taft, but getting a mention in Crain’s Detroit Business is no small feat. For those of you in the Michigan area, “Visitation is set for 3-8 p.m. Wednesday at L.J. Griffin Funeral Home, Northrop-Sassaman Chapel. Funeral services are set for 10 a.m. April 20 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Livonia. Wrathall will lie in state at 9:30 a.m. prior to funeral services.”
I forgot the drudgery that was tracking the Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (DABC) and the connections to Mormonism. It’s not over. The Utah legislature, in March, adopted the toughest drunk driving law in the nation. House Bill 155 reduced Utah’s definition of driving under the influence from a 0.08 BAC to 0.05. Rolly looks at the history of blood alcohol content in Utah, finding an editorial in the Deseret News from 1967 advocating for a 0.04 BAC (at the time, it was 0.15 percent). And of course…there has to be a Mormon connection: “That opinion piece ran in the LDS Church-owned paper about the time signatures were being gathered for a ballot initiative to legalize liquor by the drink in the Beehive State. The proposition got onto the ballot in 1968. The Salt Lake Tribune editorialized in favor of such a change, arguing it would be good for tourism. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints strongly opposed it. Guess who won.”
“Brigham Young University law professor John W. Welch will share recent scholarship on the arrest, trial and execution of Jesus. The presentation will be at the LDS Church History Museum on Thursday, April 13 at 7 p.m. as part of the Evenings at the Museum Series. Welch will present “The Trial of Jesus: From Talmage to Today,” and explore who killed Jesus and why, the connection of the raising of Lazarus with Jesus’ arrest, lessons for today about the civility and incivility from the handling of Jesus’ case, and the details in the four Gospels about the crucifixion, according to history.lds.org. Admission is free but seating is limited. No reservations are needed. For more information, visit history.lds.org/museum or call 801-240-3310.”
“If we want to understand Jesus’ execution, then, we must pay attention to what Jesus did at the temple. His was a total and visceral rejection of the high Jewish theocratic order, whose high priest had been appointed by Rome. You see it with the fig tree. In leaf and inviting from afar but barren and curse-worthy in fact. You are full of the bones of the dead and all manner of filth. This is the dharma, the way things are. Can we bear it? Can we take refuge in it?”
“Something I was keenly aware of during the ordination was that my 11-year-old daughter sitting next to me would never take on the same kinds of responsibilities as she becomes an adult in the church, and I couldn’t help wondering what she thought and how she felt about the whole thing. My guess is “probably not much,” but I was remembering her disappointment several years ago upon learning that she would not pass the sacrament when she turned 12, and an off-hand comment she made last year in connection with preparing a Primary talk about the priesthood: “Boys do everything. We do nothing.””
“I’m kind of tired of Mormons trying to take Easter all serious like. It comes off as cultural appropriation because, let’s face it, we aren’t Christians like that kind of Christian.”
“I still can’t quite understand why Easter is so minor in Utah. It’s not even a holiday! Schools could put spring break the week of Easter but rarely do. (Ours was last week) There are activities of course such as easter egg hunts. But by and large it doesn’t quite have the emphasis that Christmas does. While I love Christmas this seems quite wrong. After all while Christmas celebrates the birth of Christ, Easter commemorates the act Christ came to do…What I thought I’d do is list a few family activities we engage in. Both the fun and perhaps more secular kind as well as the religious.”
“The Book of Mormon begins with a refugee story: Lehi was a wealthy landowner in ancient Jerusalem at a time of social and political unrest. Among the first things we learn is that Lehi was a good man who tried to share what he knew—but enemies emerged in his own community, men who “sought his life, that they might take it away” (1 Ne. 1:20). Lehi and his family were forced to flee.”
Apr 13, 1997
Gordon [B. Hinckley] “Q: And this belief in contemporary revelation and prophecy? As the prophet, tell us how that works. How do you receive divine revelation? What does it feel like?
A: Let me say first that we have a great body of revelation, the vast majority of which came from the prophet Joseph Smith. We don’t need much revelation. We need to pay more attention to the revelation we’ve already received. Now, if a problem should arise on which we don’t have an answer, we pray about it, we may fast about it, and it comes. Quietly. Usually no voice of any kind, but just a perception in the mind. I liken it to Elijah’s experience. When he sought the Lord, there was a great wind, and the Lord was not in the wind. And there was an earthquake, and the Lord was not in the earthquake. And a fire, and the Lord was not in the fire. But in a still, small voice. Now that’s the way it works”
[Source: San Francisco Chronicle, Sunday, April 13, 1997]